Coastal Living In A Quintessential Cape Cod Village

August 31, 2021


This is where I live, work and play - my village Cotuit - purchased by Miles Standish in 1648 from the Wampanoag for two brass kettles and in 1658 John Alden added a hoe to the payment. Today Cotuit is year round homes for many of us but still remains a summer community. A wonderful 12 minute presentation on Cotuit history is available through the Historical Society of Cotuit & Santuit.



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Hence a Kettle and a Hoe on the sign for Memorial Park. Cotuit’s first settlers were farmers but in the early 1800s Cotuit became a working seaport. The protected harbor became home to the whaling industry. 1830 to 1880 was when most houses were built. Cotuit men were Sea Captains with 40 Captains homes in the village. Much of Cotuit’s commerce revolved around the harbor. My home, Laughing Gull Hill was the home of Captain James Childs dating from the late 1700s. We bought the house and started the restoration in 2016. The property morphed in its shape and size over the years but has remained pretty much in its original configuration.

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August brings out the best of the hydrangeas. The new well that you see in the foreground was just dug and has allowed us to water during this stretch of heat and humidity. Our gardens are loving us!

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Welcome to Laughing Gull Hill and our coastal inspired lifestyle in the charming village of Cotuit!


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Sperry Fabric Architecture a Division of Sperry Sails made this custom suspension awning which has been a life saver on hot summer days.

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This past spring we cleared our hill leading down to Cotuit Harbor and added wildflowers. We have attempted to use only indigenous plants to Cape Cod.


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Down our hill and around the corner sits the Cotuit Mosquito Yacht Club. Founded in 1906 and the oldest youth run yacht club in the country.



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Cotuit Mosquito Yacht Club - nothing fancy but sure does produce very fancy and accomplished sailors!
Visit Sandy O’Connor for more info on this Giclée on Paper.

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Every weekend these 14’, gaff rigged boats entertain the village with their racing. Our boat 66 windward of 94 is skippered by my husband Phil. All races are religiously discussed over cocktails and the story I got was that Phil could have used crew but he did manage to overtake Tom, the skipper of 94 as he had a better position rounding the mark! Phew lucky for our household that was the outcome!


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Sailors of all ages and gender take part in these races. There are teenagers racing against my 92 year old father in law!


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For me there is nothing better than a sunny day at Oregon Beach with my morning coffee and our Cape Cod Beach Chair. Made right here on Cape Cod! 

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Another Cotuit beauty, Big Red! Our friends Carol and Adam renovated Carol’s family home around the same time we were working on Laughing Gull Hill. Many wonderful gatherings at this house. During oyster season, Carol arrives at our house with a bag of fresh oysters! Only in Cotuit, known for its oysters.

During the period of 1880 to 1940 Cotuit was know as the Summer Harvard. A. Lawrence Lowell, President. of Harvard University lived here in the summer and this became quite a draw for other notable Harvard associates. It is said that Freud spent a night at Big Red!


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Gates of Cotuit…

An arbor with swing gate inviting one to walk the brick pathway. A very typical Cotuit home. Large screened in porch, white clapboards and black shutters.

A less traditional gate leading to our neighbors front gardens. I sooooo want this gate - hopefully Jan and Steve won’t notice if it’s missing.

A very simple gate marking the entrance for the Gingerbread house. This house is one of the most photographed houses on Cape Cod. The trim was hand-carved onboard whaling ships and brought back in pieces to Cotuit at the end of their sea going journeys.


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American flags go out on July 4th weekend and remain in place through to Labor Day. Cedar shakes, white & gray clapboards, front porches and a variety of picket fence styles are abundant in Cotuit…so quintessentially Cape Cod.

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Cotuit has dozens of Mansard Roofs, also know as the French roof or curb roof. The first house with a Mansard roof in Cotuit was built in 1860. If this style interests you please read Mansard Ladies. Keep checking back as I do plan to write more about Cape Cod architecture.

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It’s well worth your time to stop at the Cotuit Fresh Market. The owners Seth and Megan Burdick are fantastic and have really done a great job making the Coop as the locals fondly call the market, a destination for savory home cooked dinners plus delicious cheeses and spreads for hor d’oeuvres. Tell Seth your name once and he will greet you by name for ever after!

The Historical Society of Cotuit and Santuit has so skillfully preserved the Dottridge homestead. When you are visiting just try and imagine seven children in this little wood framed home.

Be sure to take in a Cotuit Kettleers baseball game at Lowell Park. The Cape Cod Baseball league is alive and well! It so fun to keep track of who has played on one of the town teams and then goes on to play in Major League Baseball. Think Nomar Garciaparra, Thurman Munson, and Jason Varitek just to name a few.

The Kettle Ho is a tribute in title to the purchase price for Cotuit. Great little watering hole. Full bar and a very tasty Kettle Ho burger! Everything is in walking distance or a short bike ride.



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Hope you enjoyed visiting Cotuit…



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A House of Chairs…